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How to recycle your old technology

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Geoff Augutis discusses what you can do with your unwanted e-waste.

Geoff Augutis from Queensland Computers in Bundaberg looks at where electronic waste goes and what people can do to recycle technology.

Australians are a very excitable bunch when it comes to the consumption and uptake of technology.

We are in fact among the highest users of new technology in the world proportional to our population, buying literally millions of new computers every year.

But where does it all go?

The nature of tech products means that they are comprised of many valuable (and hazardous) components.

These include resources such as zinc, copper, tin, nickel and sometimes even gold and silver.

For the reasons above and environmental responsibility, e-waste has become a huge priority all around the globe.

Recycle your technology the right way

While many of us buy new products, we often don’t think about where the old ones are going when we scrap them, or often don’t even bother scrapping them and have a “tech graveyard” cupboard somewhere in our house.

Often this is just a matter of lack of clarity and the inconvenience to act, so let’s clear things up.

Tech Collect is a not-for-profit organisation that works under the governments “National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme” or NTCRS (catchy!).

The way the scheme works is simple, and we now really have no excuse to avoid using it.

The users (you): Essentially you take your e-waste to one of many local drop off points and dump them free of charge in the designated e-waste areas so your old technology can be recycled in the right hands.

Locally these areas include the Council waste facility at University Drive.

The goods you can take include TVs, computers, printers and all sorts of peripherals (keyboards, web cams, components, etc).

The manufacturers: As with most programs, there are costs involved in responsibly disposing of end-of-life goods.

This is where the scheme comes in.

NTCRS works with these vendors and importers whom pay for the costs associated with this scheme.

It allows for the costs to be worn by the vendors and remains free for the users.

Recycling of tech is something that is now easy and free for 98 per cent of Australians.

If you aren’t sure on the finer details just contact a facility near you or google “NTCRS” to find out more about the scheme.

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