HomeHistoryMoore Park Beach history book launched

Moore Park Beach history book launched

Moore Park Beach Community Association
Cr Jason Bartels and Community Association president Shanelle Pekin with the new history book of Moore Park Beach.

A new Moore Park Beach history book was launched recently at the Moore Park Beach Community Association annual meeting.

Moore Park (more than just a) Beach – A Short History was written by local historian and media consultant Ross Peddlesden and designed by Tara Jacobsen from Petals and Print.

Moore Park Beach Community Association president Shanelle Pekin said it was a fascinating overview of the community’s history.

“The book begins with the traditional owners and chronicles the European development of the area,” Shanelle said.

“It mentions, for instance, that there were four indigenous ‘skin groups' in our area, one of which was known as Bunda and which, when coupled with the Teutonic word berg or town, made up the town’s official name, Bundaberg.

“As you read the book you will meet and read about a number of interesting and influential individuals and families who have made a huge contribution to the district, including Issac Moore after whom our community is named.”

Shanelle said the story gives a good context for the more recent development of Moore Park Beach up to the present day.

“We envisage and hope that it will generate a lot of interest locally, across Queensland and interstate,” she said.

“We invite all to contribute more detail, stories and pictures for a second and even more detailed edition that Ross the author has said he will be happy to do.

“We encourage residents and those who have visited Moore Park Beach over the years to get out those old photos and see what they can find.

“This book is ours, it belongs to the Association and all the money raised in future editions will be used to promote Moore Park Beach and help meet the needs of our residents.”

Divisional representative Cr Jason Bartels commended everyone involved.

“It's an absolute credit to all those who have contributed information, stories, photos, and such to make it a reality,” Cr Bartels said.

“A big shout-out needs to go to Ross Peddlesden, the author and editor who put it all together to create this detailed collection of historical information of the area; and to Tara Jacobsen the graphic artist who put it in book form.

“I would also like to acknowledge and thank the person who made this book a reality.

“They want to remain anonymous, but their generous contribution and forethought to commission what they saw as a need for a history book on Moore Park Beach to be developed, and then assigning the rights of the book with all proceeds from sales to go to the Moore Park Beach Community Association, is amazingly generous and community minded.”

The book is on sale for $18 and will be posted anywhere in Australia for a flat rate of $6, by emailing mpbcommunityassociation@gmail.com and arranging a bank transfer.

It can be purchased at the Pink House (near the caravan park and surf club) and The Hub on Sylvan Drive, with more outlets coming soon. 

More details can be found on the Moore Park Beach Community Association Facebook page.

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