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Felecity a community champion in Gin Gin

Felecity Gin Gin
Felecity’s passion for the Gin Gin community has been shared as part of Bundaberg Regional Council's Our People Our Stories Project, which aims to bring people together through a connection to community.

Providing support to others runs through the blood of Gin Gin’s Felecity Manderson, with the proud local walking in the steps of her mother and grandmother as a community champion.

The strong female influences Felecity has had throughout her life have helped her develop a tireless work ethic which she puts into practice throughout multiple volunteer organisations.

Felecity’s passion for community has been shared as part of Bundaberg Regional Council's Our People Our Stories Project, which aims to bring people together through a connection to community.

Third generation Gin Gin born-and-bred, Felecity has recently taken on a role with the Gin Gin and District Historical Society and brings a fresh perspective with her years of knowledge that was passed down from her mum and grandmother. 

Her grandmother, Daph Saunders, was a community hero in her own right and her legacy lives on through Felecity’s commitments. 

“She was known as the Grandma of Gin Gin and she started the Gin Gin District Historical Society which held a lot of community events,” Felecity said.

Alongside her parents and grandmother, Felecity has helped numerous local organisations, including spending decades within the local Scout Group and with Masonic body, Order of the Eastern Star.

Felecity said community service was almost a hobby for her and volunteering was something she enjoyed from a young age.

As a child, she recalls her mother stepping in to help when she realised the local scout group could close its doors due to lack of volunteers.

“My brother was a youth member and when he got to cub scouts, the leader at the time had to step down,” Felecity said.

“They called a parent meeting and said if we can’t get help, we will have to fold so my brother came home and begged, even though my mother ran two businesses and a farm.

“Mum put her hand up and when I was 16 I became a cub scout instructor to be her offsider.

“When I was 18, I trained to be an assistant cub scout leader. I have clocked up 25 years in varying roles.”

Felecity said her life had been enriched through her willingness to take on various roles within organisations and she encouraged others to become involved in a local group or two to keep the community spirit alive.

She also said for those already involved, be willing to change with the times. For those who are not, “get involved so that we don’t lose our community spirit for future generations”.

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