HomeCouncilAunty Marina loves to share in heritage, culture

Aunty Marina loves to share in heritage, culture

Aunty Marina culture
Aunty Marina Anderson's passion for her culture is what drove her to start the Wan'di Aboriginal Corporation in Gin Gin where people meet frequently for discussions and celebrations.

Local Taribelang elder Aunty Marina Anderson is proud of her history and heritage.

Her passion for her culture is what drove her to start the Wan'di Aboriginal Corporation in Gin Gin where people meet frequently for discussions and celebrations.

“Wan'di means gather together,” Aunty Marina said.

“People came on board and decided, because there wasn’t much happening in Gin Gin, to form the Wan’di Aboriginal Group to try to push for more culture.”

Aunty Marina and her passion for her heritage has been told as part of Bundaberg Regional Council's Our People Our Stories project, which celebrates local residents.

She said showcasing culture to the community, especially to the younger generation, was important to her.

“We would like to see more involvement, looking after the land, learning about culture and sharing and helping one another,” she said,

“How we have it today, if you want to find out about anything you will find it on Facebook instead of talking to one another!”

Aunty Marina said she had always been a proud local of the Gin Gin area and surrounds.

She was born in Tirroan in 1934 and eventually moved to Truslon Street, Gin Gin and has been there for 50 years.

It was chaotic times growing up, according to Aunty, who said with nine brothers and sisters in the family there was always plenty happening.

“We never had a fridge and lived on a dirt floor,” she said.

“My brothers taught me how to ride my bike, there were lots of bloodied knees!

“I went to primary school until age 14 then I started working.”

Aunty Marina said her parents worked hard to support the family, with her Dad taking on many roles including a jockey and a drover.

“Dad was even asked to take horses over to India in the Second World War, but he said no because he didn’t want to leave Australia,” she said.

“My brothers had to miss school because dad had to do droving and they went with him, all the boys worked with horses.”

Aunty Marina said she had grown up with a great respect for her hometown, her culture and her way of life and hoped the same sentiment would be passed on to others in the future.

“If you look after the land, the land will look after you,” she said.

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