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Public education campaign to combat mosquitoes

Council's environmental health team has initiated a public education campaign on mosquito control and use various methods to combat mosquitoes.
Council's environmental health team has initiated a public education campaign on mosquito control and use various methods to combat mosquitoes.

Wet weather has increased mosquitoes in the region prompting a public education campaign on mosquito control by Council's environmental health team.

The campaign is reminding residents mosquitoes are on the move and to regularly clean out backyard items which may carry water.

The team routinely undertakes surveillance to identify and monitor mosquitoes and to detect mosquito-borne pathogens.

Coordinator Environmental Health Services Chris Vakas said control methods included the placement of monitoring stations in mosquito problem areas.

“The stations slowly release lavaside which is an effective growth inhibitor that stops mosquitoes from emerging as a biting mosquito,” he said.

“The lavaside is target specific and doesn't affect other habitat.

“We ask anyone who sees a mosquito station not to touch it.

Mosquito control methods include the placement of monitoring stations in mosquito problem areas.
Mosquito control methods include the placement of monitoring stations in mosquito problem areas.

“We also set traps to identify what diseases the mosquitoes are carrying and which species bite.

“Out of the traps we've set recently six contained Ross River but that has now reduced to two so we're getting on top of it.”

Another method the team uses in controlling mosquitoes is barrier spraying which requires licensed operation by Council's Natural Areas team once or twice a year.

Fogging is no longer carried out as it is not target specific and kills everything such as birds, bees and insects that are beneficial to the environment.

Chris explained the team worked at encouraging natural predators into the water like fish, frogs and crustaceans such as the copepod which is one of the most abundant found in fresh and salt waterways.

For mosquito control tips on how to prevent mosquito breeding around the home, head to the Public Health page on Council's website.

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