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Guy shares skills in weed spotters role

Guy Weed Spotters
In this role for a little over two years now, Guy Hancock has assisted local members of the group and the general community with species identification and liaison with Queensland Herbarium and Biosecurity Queensland.

Volunteering as the Bundaberg Regional Coordinator for Weed Spotters Network Queensland has seen Council Land Protection Officer Guy Hancock share his expertise to combat invasive plants.

In this role for a little over two years now, Guy has assisted local members of the group and the general community with species identification and liaison with Queensland Herbarium and Biosecurity Queensland.

After learning about the group’s need for a Bundaberg regional coordinator, Guy thought joining weed spotters would complement his Council role with providing advice to interested environmental enthusiasts.

“The queries I receive generally fall in within my work as a Land Protection Officer where I deal with a large number of requests and questions relating to invasive species identification,” he said.

“It’s another way of being on the front foot for identifying and flagging potential new invasive species incursions and outbreaks in our region at the earliest opportunity, as well as spreading awareness and education.

“It’s also a way I can increase my weed identification knowledge and liaise with other Regional Coordinators on potential new incursions that may threaten our immediate region.”

Guy recommends a variety of ways we can all play a part in helping to eradicate invasive plants.

“Avoid purchasing and planting introduced species by choosing natives instead and buy through reputable nurseries,” he said.

“There are also some fantastic apps like Weeds of South East QLD where keying in features of a plant identifies if it is an invasive species.

“The Weed Spotters Network Queensland has also introduced an e-Learning course on understanding weeds and how to report a potential weed for identification.”

Council’s Land Protection team is also available to help.

If in doubt, just send them a photo and they will assist in identifying the plant.

More information about pest plants and the work Council’s Land Protection team is doing can be found here on Council’s website.

This includes information on the Plant Swap Program where residents receive free native plants in exchange for removing environmental weeds from their backyards.

Find out more about he Weed Spotters Network Queensland here.

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